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The Office of the Provost has created this page to guide the Tufts community about the Executive Order 13780 , entitled “Protecting the Nation from foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States,” that was initially issued on January 27, 2017, revised and reissued on March 6, 2017, and expanded on September 24, 2017.  Frequently Asked Questions about the Executive Order are answered below.  We continue to monitor the situation and evaluate the impacts of the Executive Order on the Tufts community.  We will continue to post updates on this page when new developments occur or when new information is available.

Executive Order Frequently Asked Questions

Chart of how Travel Ban 3.0 affects foreign nationals from affected countries
International Travel and U.S. Immigration Presentation from Landoli Desai and Cronin P.C., December 2017

Latest News and Updates

December 4, 2017 Update

On Monday, the Supreme Court granted President Trump’s request to fully enforce the latest version of the travel ban (Presidential Proclamation of September 24), banning travel to the U.S by residents of eight countries (Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad, Somalia, North Korea and certain people from Venezuela) while legal challenges to it proceed in lower courts.

Notably, this decision lifts injunctions that exempted travelers from these countries who had “bona fide” connections with relatives or institutions in the U.S. from the ban imposed by the latest Presidential Proclamation. As a result, for now, most citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Chad, Yemen and Somalia will not be able to travel to the United States.  If you had a valid visa as of October 15 that is still valid, you are not covered by this ban. In addition, citizens from Iran may still apply for and obtain F-1 and J-1 visas, but will be subject to extra screening, and Somali citizens will be able to visit (though not emigrate to) the United States.

The bar on all travelers from North Korea and certain travelers from Venezuela remain unchanged under this decision as the “bona fide” relationship clause injunction did not extend to these countries.

Two appeals courts are scheduled to hear arguments in separate cases challenging the travel ban this week.

For members of the Tufts community from one of the affected countries, the University’s advice regarding travel remains the same – if you can reasonably avoid discretionary travel outside of the U.S., we recommend that you continue to do so. If you need to travel, please reach out to your international office or Diana Chigas, Senior International Officer and Associate Provost, to ensure you are up to date on the latest developments.

November 16, 2017 Update

On Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco ruled that the travel restrictions in the Trump Administration’s latest Presidential Proclamation can partly take effect.  The appeals panel limited the scope of the decision by the federal district court in Hawaii in October, upholding the decision that people from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen with a “bona fide relationship” with close family or an entity in the US should be allowed entry. However, the appeals court blocked the Hawaii court’s ruling concerning people without such ties, meaning that people without a “bona fide relationship” to the United States can now be prevented from entering the United States.

A “bona fide relationship” is defined as a close familial relationship or formal, documented relationship with an entity, such as a university or employer. A close familial relationship extends to grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins.

The restrictions outlined in the latest ban for the applicable nationals of North Korea and Venezuela remain intact.

This ruling should have no effect on members of Tufts’ international community who are in the United States with a valid visa, but people coming to Tufts from the six countries should expect longer processing times for their visas to allow for proving bona fide relationships.

November 6, 2017 Update

The Provost’s Office, together with the Office of University Counsel, the International Center (Medford), the Office of International Affairs (Boston) and the Fletcher School’s International Adviser, will host community forums in both Medford and Boston on December 4th with our outside immigration legal counsel (Iandoli and Associates) to explain the requirements and answer any questions you may have.

Community Forums on Travel Executive Order and Presidential Proclamation

Monday, December 4, 2017:

12 – 1 pm: Dowling Hall, 745A&B, Medford Campus

3 – 4 pm: Posner Auditorium, 200 Harrison Ave, Boston Campus

As you likely know, on September 24, President Trump issued a Presidential Proclamation entitled, “Enhancing Vetting capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.”  This replaced the travel ban imposed by the Executive Order of March 6, 2017.  The Proclamation designates 8 countries—Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen—for partial or full restrictions on entry to the United States.  Iraq has been removed from the list of proscribed countries; however, Iraqi nationals seeking entry to the United States will still be subject to additional scrutiny.

Under this new Proclamation, if you have a visa that you obtained on or before September 24, are a green card holder from one of the 8 countries, or are a dual national traveling on your other passport (for example, a dual Iranian Canadian citizen seeking to enter the U.S. on a Canadian passport), you are not subject to entry restrictions. In addition, NATO or UN-specific visas are not covered by the new ban.

The new travel ban was scheduled to go into effect on October 18. However, federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland issued orders blocking President Trump’s latest travel ban, effectively delaying the implementation date – for now.

As you may recall, decisions blocking the previous Executive Order were appealed to the Supreme Court, which dismissed the case on the grounds that it was moot because the earlier  travel ban had expired and been replaced by the provisions of the new Proclamation.

The federal court in Maryland blocked enforcement of the directives of this latest Proclamation on people who have a “bona fide” relationship with a person or entity in the United States, while the federal court in Hawaii blocked enforcement of the Proclamation in its entirety.  The Trump Administration has already indicated its intention to appeal these decisions.

Consistent with the provisions of the Proclamation, if you are from one of the eight countries covered by it, and have a visa that will still be valid when you plan to return to the U.S., you should be able to travel outside the U.S. and return, though you should be prepared to experience enhanced screening or vetting at Consulates (if you are applying for a visa stamp, for example), and enhanced security and screening at the border.

However, because the legal landscape remains unsettled, the University’s advice regarding travel cautiously remains: If you can reasonably avoid discretionary travel outside the United States, we recommend that you continue to do so. If you need to travel, please reach out to your international office or to Diana Chigas, Senior International Officer and Associate Provost, to ensure you are up to date on the latest developments.

October 20, 2017 Update

This week, federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland issued orders blocking President Trump’s latest travel ban.  The latest Presidential Proclamation, issued on September 24 and replacing the previous Executive Order (of March 6, 2017), had been scheduled to go into effect on October 18.  Decisions blocking the previous Executive Order had been appealed to the Supreme Court, which dismissed the case on the grounds that that it was moot as its travel ban had expired and been replaced by the provisions of the new Proclamation.

The federal court in Maryland blocked enforcement of the directives of this latest Proclamation on people who have a “bona fide” relationship with a person or entity in the United States, while the federal court in Hawaii blocked enforcement of the Proclamation in its entirety for the decision.  The Trump Administration has indicated its intention to appeal these decisions.

Consistent with the provisions of the Proclamation, if you are from one of the eight countries covered by it, and have a visa that will still be valid when you plan to return to the U.S., you should be able to travel outside the U.S. and return. You should be prepared to experience enhanced screening or vetting at Consulates (if you are applying for a visa stamp, for example), and enhanced security and screening at the border.

However, because the legal landscape remains unsettled, the University’s advice regarding travel cautiously remains: If you can reasonably avoid discretionary travel outside the United States, we recommend that you continue to do so. If you need to travel, please reach out to your international office or to Diana Chigas, Senior International Officer and Associate Provost, to ensure you are up to date on the latest developments.

September 24, 2017 Update

New travel restrictions go into effect

On September 24, President Trump issued a Presidential Proclamation entitled, “Enhancing Vetting capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.”  This replaces the travel ban imposed by the Executive Order of March 6, 2017.  The Proclamation designates 8 countries—Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen—for partial or full restrictions on entry to the United States.  Iraq has been removed from the list of proscribed countries; however, Iraqi nationals seeking entry to the United States will be subject to additional scrutiny

The Proclamation went into effect partially on September 24 and will enter into full effect on October 18.

If you have a visa that you obtained on or before September 24, are a green card holder from one of the 8 countries, or are a dual national traveling on your other passport (for example, a dual Iranian Canadian citizen seeking to enter the U.S. on a Canadian passport), the Proclamation does not apply to you.  In addition, NATO or UN-specific visas are not covered by the new ban.

Since the original Executive Order was issued in January, Tufts has worked with other universities to support legal challenges to the Executive Order; most recently, Tufts contributed to an amicus brief supporting the challenge to the Executive Order before the U.S. Supreme Court, scheduled for oral argument on October 10.  However, since the new vetting procedures are aimed at replacing the earlier Executive Order, the U.S. Supreme Court cancelled the hearing and directed the parties to file briefs addressing whether or to what extent the new Proclamation renders the cases moot.

The “Frequently Asked Questions” section below provides summary of key provisions of the new travel ban and answers to questions members of the Tufts community might have. It is also downloadable here.  The full text of the Proclamation can be found here.  The White House has also published a shorter Fact Sheet about the Proclamation, as well as FAQ. We will continue to monitor the situation and provide updates as we receive more information on how the Proclamation will be implemented.

September 19, 2017 Update

On September 18, Tufts joined 30 universities calling on the Supreme Court to strike down President Trump’s Executive Order by filing a joint amicus brief. This reflects Tufts’ commitment to students and faculty from around the world.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on the Executive Order on October 10.

June 28, 2017 Update

Tufts Responds to Supreme Court Ruling

President Monaco pledges to support and protect past, present, and future international students and faculty.

June 26, 2017 Update

Today, the Supreme Court granted certiorari for the travel ban cases and agreed to hear oral arguments this fall.  In the meantime, the Court reinstated the administration’s travel ban – at least, in part.

  • The reinstated travel ban only applies to foreign nationals from the six designated countries (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) who lack “any bona fide relationship with any person or entity in the US.”
  • The reinstated ban does not apply to students who have been accepted to US universities or employees who work for US companies because these individuals have “bona fide” relationships with U.S. entities that exempt them from the ban.

See full text of the opinion here.

Based on today’s decision, current and incoming Tufts’ students, faculty and staff should still be able to travel abroad and return to the United States.  As always, however, we must note that individual travelers may experience heightened screening requirements and delays, as enforcement agencies and airlines come to grips with yet another version of the travel ban. Please be sure to carry documentation evidencing your connection to Tufts (I-20, DS-2019, Non-immigrant visa approval notices, letters of appointment).  If you encounter difficulty returning to Tufts, please contact Tufts University Police Department (TUPD) at 617-627-3030 .

Tufts remains deeply committed to our international community and recognizes that today’s decision will impact many of our friends and colleagues who do not, as of yet, have a “bona fide” relationship with us.  We will continue to watch these developments closely in the weeks and months ahead and encourage you to be in touch with your international office with any questions:

  • Jane-Etish Andrews – Tufts International Center for Medford Campus, Grafton Campus, and HNRCA/Friedman (students and faculty)
  • Ghenwa Hakim – Office of International Affairs for Boston Campus (students and faculty, except Friedman/HNRCA)
  • Reiko Morris – Fletcher School (students only)
  • Diana Chigas – staff not serviced by the above-mentioned offices.”

March 22, 2017 Update:

New Restrictions on Electronic Devices and Possible Difficulties Entering the United States

On March 21, 2017, Transportation Safety Authority (TSA) restricted airline passengers from bringing large electronic devices (laptops, tablets, e-readers, electronic games, portable printers, cameras, etc.) in carry-on luggage on flights from the following 10 airports:

Queen Alia International Airport (AMM) (Amman, Jordan)

Cairo International Airport (CAI) (Cairo, Egypt)

Ataturk International Airport (IST) (Istanbul, Turkey)

King Abdul-Aziz International Airport (JED) (Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)

King Khalid International Airport (RUH) (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)

Kuwait International Airport (KWI) (Farwaniya, Kuwait)

Mohammed V Airport (CMN) (Casablanca, Morocco)

Hamad International Airport (DOH) (Doha, Qatar)

Dubai International Airport (DXB) (Dubai)

Abu Dhabi International Airport (AUH) (Abu Dhabi)

All travelers coming to the United States from these airports should place large electronic devices in their checked luggage.  Passengers can carry cellphones/smartphones on the plane.

For a fact sheet on the new security measures, see this fact sheet.

The United Kingdom has adopted similar measures for flights from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.

Executive Order FAQ

PRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATION ENHANCING VETTING CAPABILITIES AND PROCESSES FOR DETECTING ATTEMPTED ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES BY TERRORISTS OR OTHER PUBLIC-SAFETY THREATS

On September 24, President Trump issued a Presidential Proclamation entitled, “Enhancing Vetting capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.”  This replaces the travel ban imposed by the Executive Order of March 6, 2017.  The Proclamation designates 8 countries—Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen—for partial or full restrictions on entry to the United States.  The Proclamation went into effect partially on September 24 and will enter into full effect on October 18.

This “Frequently Asked Questions” provides a summary of the key provisions of the new travel ban and answers to questions members of the Tufts community might have. The full text of the Proclamation can be found here.  The White House has also published a shorter Fact Sheet about the Proclamation, as well as FAQ.

Tufts University is continuing to work with local area schools, agencies and other legal resources to learn more about the new Proclamation and its potential impact on our community.  As always, we will update you as new information becomes available and welcome your questions and comments.  We will continue to monitor the situation and provide updates as we receive more information on how the Proclamation will be implemented.

What do the new travel restrictions do?

The travel ban initially imposed by the Executive Order signed by President Trump on January 27, 2017 and revised on March 6 will be replaced with the new travel restrictions outlined in this Proclamation, issued by President Trump on September 24, 2017. In accordance with the Proclamation, restrictions on entry into the US for individuals from Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen will be put into place for an indefinite period of time. The restrictions differ from country to country.  Iraq has been removed from the list of proscribed countries, but Iraqi nationals will be subject to additional scrutiny to determine if they pose a threat to the national security or public safety of the United States.

Who is impacted by the Presidential Proclamation?

The Order impacts all Tufts students, faculty, staff and scholars who are citizens of one of the 8 countries and who have non-immigrant visas (F-1, J-1, H-1B, etc.) or immigrant visas.  For citizens of Iraq, although there are no longer any entry restrictions, there will be additional scrutiny during the visa application process.

The restrictions are different for nationals of each country, and apply only to people who:

  • Are outside of the United States on the effective date (see below);
  • Do not have a valid visa on the effective date; and/or
  • Do not qualify for a visa or other valid travel document.

If you are in the United States and have a valid visa, you are not affected by this order.  No valid visa issued before the date of the Proclamation will be revoked under this order.

Following is a summary of the affected countries and categories of applicants who will not be allowed entry into the United States:

Country Scope of travel suspension
Chad
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2) or business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas
Iran
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants
  • Entry of people with valid student (F and M) and exchange (J) visas is permitted, but F, M and J visa applicants will be subject to enhanced screening and vetting
Iraq
  • Removed from the list of proscribed countries; entry is permitted for immigrants and non-immigrants
  • Visa applicants subject to additional scrutiny to determine if they pose risks to the national security or public safety of the U.S
Libya
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2) or business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas
North Korea
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants
Somalia
  • No entry as immigrants
  • Non-immigrant visa applications will be subject to additional scrutiny to check for connections to terrorist organizations and threats to national security
Syria
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants
Venezuela
  • No entry for certain government officials and their immediate family members as non-immigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2) or business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas
  • Other visa holders subject to additional security measures
Yemen
  • No entry as immigrants
  • No entry as non-immigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2) or business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas

Who is not affected by the new travel restrictions?

The new ban does NOT apply to:

  • Lawful permanent residents of the United States;
  • Dual citizens of one of the countries and a non-designated country traveling on a passport issued by the non-designated country;
  • Individuals traveling on a diplomatic visa, NATO visa, and/or C-2, G-1, G-2, G-2 and G-4 visas; and
  • Foreign nationals who have been granted asylum and refugees already admitted to the United States.

The Proclamation allows US consular officers or designated officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to grant WAIVERS on a case-by-case basis, on the conditions that a) denying entry will cause undue hardship; b) entry will not pose a threat to national security or public safety in the United States; and c) entry would be in the national interest.  Examples include:

  • Foreign nationals previously admitted to the U.S. for a continuous period of work, study or long-term activity, are outside the U.S. and are coming back to resume that activity (e.g., a semester abroad, internship or research outside the US, etc.);
  • People who have “previously established significant contacts” with the U.S. but are outside the U.S. for work, study or other lawful activity on the effective date;
  • Foreign nationals seeking to come to the U.S. to visit or reside with close family members (child, spouse, parent) who is a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or holder of a valid nonimmigrant visa, and denial of entry would cause undue hardship to the foreign national;
  • Children, infants, adoptees, people needing urgent medical care;
  • Foreign nationals who have been employed by or on behalf of the U.S. government, and can document provision of “faithful and valuable service” to the U.S. Government;
  • Canadian permanent residents who apply for a visa at a location within Canada; and/or
  • Foreign nationals traveling as U.S. government-sponsored exchange visitors.

When does it take effect?

The restrictions are effective immediately (i.e., as of September 24) for people previously covered by the March 6 travel ban and who don’t have a credible claim of a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States”.  They enter into effect on October 18 for all other impacted individuals—i.e. affected people from Chad, North Korea and Venezuela, and for people from the remaining countries who do have a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”

How long will the restrictions last?

There is no end date for the restrictions.  The restrictions may be revised or removed if the Secretary of Homeland Security determines that a country meets the required identity management, national security and public safety information, and information sharing practices with other countries.  Recommendations could also be made to add restrictions or limitations to these countries or new countries if the Secretary of Homeland Security determines that there has been a change regarding security or information-sharing practices of those countries.

The Secretary of Homeland Security is required to submit reports to the President every 180 days with recommendations on whether to continue or amend the Proclamations’ restrictions, and is required to provide periodic reports to the President on what steps are being taken to improve vetting procedures for nationals of all countries.

How does the Presidential Proclamation affect applications for visa extensions or for immigration benefits?

The Proclamation specifically targets individuals from the 8 countries who are entering the U.S.  As of now, it does not appear that the restrictions will have a direct impact on USCIS adjudications of applications and petitions for benefits (e.g., to change, extend or adjust status in the U.S.), but we will continue to monitor this situation which remains highly fluid.

What is Tufts doing in response to the Executive Order?

Tufts has taken a clear and strong stand against the immigration restrictions since the first Executive Order was issued on January 27, 2017.  President Monaco issued a statement two days after that Executive Order was issued, expressing Tufts’ commitment to protect and support the international members of our university community, and Provost Harris reiterated this commitment after the Supreme Court had decided to unblock part of the Executive Order in June.

On February 2, the University signed on to a letter to President Trump, organized by the Presidents of the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University.   The following day, Tufts signed onto a letter to the Department of Homeland Security organized by the American Council on Education, and On February 3, Tufts  joined seven other private colleges and universities in Massachusetts (including Harvard, MIT, BC, Northeastern, WPI, Brandeis and BU) in filing an amicus brief in the Massachusetts case seeking a permanent injunction of the Executive Order.  The amicus brief began by quoting part of President Monaco’s message to the Tufts community: “We take great pride in the global nature of our community and have always embraced and valued our international members from around the world. They are our colleagues and friends. Our community and the world are better places because of what we learn and create together.”

Tufts recently joined other colleges and universities in filing an amicus brief to the US Supreme Court in support of the challenges to President Trump’s Executive Order, reaffirming our commitment to the international members of our community and to the free exchange of ideas across borders.  Since the new vetting procedures in the Proclamation are aimed at replacing the Executive Order, the US Supreme Court cancelled the hearing scheduled for October 10th and directed the parties to file briefs addressing whether or to what extent the new Proclamation renders the cases moot.

What advice is Tufts giving regarding travel?

If you are from one of the eight countries, and have a valid visa (that will be valid when you plan to return to the U.S.), you should be able to travel outside the U.S. and return. However, you should also be prepared to experience enhanced screening or vetting at Consulates (if you are applying for a visa stamp, for example), and enhanced security and screening at the border.

Given the uncertainty of the situation, until we have more information about how the new ban will be implemented, and what (if any) legal challenges may be brought against it, our advice cautiously remains:  If you can reasonably avoid discretionary travel outside the United States, we recommend that you continue to do so.  If you need to travel, please reach out to your international office or to Diana Chigas, Senior International Officer and Associate Provost, before you travel, to ensure you are up to date on the latest developments.

For all travelers (whether or not you are from one of the 8 countries) going outside the United States: Please take time to review these recommendations, especially if you are traveling outside the U.S.:

  • If you are traveling on Tufts-organized or work-related trips, be sure to register your travel with the Tufts Travel Registry. Registering will help the University be able to contact you to assist you in the event of an emergency or any unexpected developments.  It will also give you access to very useful medical and travel insurance, as well as regular updates and information on the situation in the countries you are traveling to, when you are on Tufts-related travel.
  • Please also make sure you are updated on the latest rules and regulations concerning re-entry to the United States, as guidelines are subject to change at any time. Visit the site of the Office of the Provost,  the International Center or the Office of International Affairs at Tufts School of Medicine to keep informed of any changes in immigration regulations, travel recommendations and resources.
  • Please ensure your passport is valid for reentry, that you hold the appropriate and valid visa in your passport, and that you carry with you all required immigration documents (e.g., Form DS-2019/I-20, valid passport, valid visa, etc.). While not necessary, a letter from your department or dean describing your activities and contributions could be helpful if you anticipate difficulty, especially if you are traveling to one of the seven countries. A template and sample are available for download HERE.
  • Be prepared for heightened security measures/extra screening at the airport, so plan accordingly (e.g., for delays, more intrusive searches, etc.).
  • Consider whether you need to carry electronic devices, such as computers or cell phones. You should expect delays as well as more intrusive inspections. We have learned that personal electronic devices are now routinely being seized for inspection, so we would recommend that, if you are traveling, you should, if possible, seek alternatives to traveling with your devices. It may be best to travel with a “clean” laptop, if possible, and, if not, be mindful of any sensitive or confidential data that may be carried on or synced to your devices.
  • For any questions or if you need any documentation (e.g., letter), please contact your international office.

Keep the phone number and contact information of your international office with you in case you need assistance coming into the United States.

  • IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY: If you encounter any difficulty entering the United States and cannot reach your international office, please contact the Tufts University Police Department (TUPD) at 617-627-3030, and they will connect you directly with one of us at the University to assist you in any way we can.  Please note that the TUPD number should be used for emergency situations only, in which your detention prevents you from returning to Tufts.

Tufts University is continuing to work with local area schools, agencies and other legal resources to learn more about the new Proclamation and its potential impact on our community.  As always, we will update you as new information becomes available and welcome your questions and comments.

What resources are available?

Assistance on immigration and visas: The University is helping affected members of our community, including connecting them to legal resources where needed.  For ongoing questions regarding your visa status, applicants and renewals or other immigration-related questions, please contact the following offices for assistance:

  • Jane-Etish Andrews  – Medford Campus, Grafton Campus, and HNRCA/Friedman (students and faculty)
  • Ghenwa Hakim – Boston Campus (students and faculty)
  • Reiko Ohmura – Fletcher School (students only)
  • Diana Chigas  – people not serviced by the above-mentioned offices

Counseling and Mental HealthServices are available for those who have been or may be impacted by the Executive Order.

Medford: The Counseling and Mental Health Service, 120 Curtis Street

The Counseling and Mental Health Service will be holding a drop-in group conversation hour on Friday afternoons from 2pm – 3pm for students who have been, or may be impacted by the recent Executive Order on immigration.  The group will provide a safe space for participants to converse and connect with others who have similar concerns, provide mutual support, and discuss strategies for self-care and managing stress. The groups will be held at the Counseling and Mental Health Service, at 120 Curtis Street, diagonally across the street from Fletcher Field.  No registration is necessary.  Groups will be held each Friday afternoon at the same time and place for the month of February, and may continue beyond that date if there is sufficient interest.

Boston: Student Wellness Advising: 200 Harrison Avenue, Posner Hall, 4th Floor

Sharon Snaggs Gendron is available to provide support and discuss strategies for managing stress for those on the Boston campus affected by the Executive Order.